Order of drag upgrades?

Jun 27, 2017
48
#1
For straight-line dig racing, there seems to be a laundry list of possible upgrades but it seems unclear what might be the best order, what's overkill, and what's good bang for buck. Starting this thread to list out things for myself but I welcome input :)

Clutch: (not relevant to auto boys)
This is obviously dependent on engine power and when peak torque hits, but at what point is a twin disc necessary vs overkill? Comparing to wallet-friendly options like the 335is or spec 3+. If you want to get into the 10's, will a spec3+ work?
~$300 550/335is : good to 600wtq -- but does it hold up with launching?
~$700 Spec3+ : good to 750wtq -- what's longevity with racing?
$1500+ Twin Disc: Will hold the world

Differential:
$100 Diff Lockdown Bracket: Cheap insurance to mitigate wheel hop, or so I've heard.
$250 Welded Diff : This price is variable depending on who you know but if this is livable it'll hold into the 9's but there is the downside that not many would daily this setup.
$1500+ Proper LSD: For drag racing, even these can break if punished but is great all rounder for daily/strip/track.

Axles:
There have been no lack of stories about people snapping OE axles at the line with a grippy tire and modest power (sub 450). Are the $1000 DSS axles our only option and are they immediately necessary for safe 1.X 60' ? Does having other upgrades prevent axle-snapping wheel hop?

Tire:
Given that 99% of n5x cars aren't in the 9's or 10's even, a bias ply seems like overkill but I've heard it can ease the shock for axles or guibo's breaking (not to mention flywheel/clutch/trans). Is it possible (and cost effective) to have both a daily tire/wheel setup or go straight to an extra set for drag?

Streetable:
~ $150/ea : Common options I see are HK RS4, BFG Cup2, and Mich Cup4s. These keep nice road-going manners but can sometimes lack grip at higher horsepower and while good all-rounders aren't ideal for dig launches.
$100/ea 595 rs-rr: Cheap "street" tire with loads of grip at the downside of road noise. I daily these so the noise is a bit overblown but definitely miss my regular quiet street tires. In a downpour, would be parking the car as these aren't the safest in the wet.

Race-only, would require extra wheels:
R-comps : R888R, RE-71R, NT01, Direzza SS around $250/ea
Drag Radials: Hoosier and MT ET both offer DRs that can get good 1.X times but aren't rain-friendly. Are these the go-to?
Full blown bias-ply. The question is 17" or 15"? Is the rear brake downgrade and suspension adjustment worth the extra tenths?

Suspension:
~$250 Springs: Will changing spring rates for stock shocks make any real difference for launching
~$600 Budget Suspension : Koni and Megan the only names that come to mind but will these be helpful for the budget-minded enthusiast?
~$1000 Coilovers : Will normal coilover setups like BC/KW/SW/ST/etc allow for good drag racing? Do we need customized or specific coilovers to get these launches down? I hope these categories of coilovers will improve and not worsen straight-line performance

$10+k Ford : Hopefully nobody thinks you can maintain a daily-friendly car with serious changes like this.
I've seen very few people with successful ford RE swaps given the enormous cost ($10k). Is this overkill for 10 seconds?

There are also the other odds and ends which I haven't fully researched to get an understanding on their benefits and necessities in straight-line performance. We've got bushings, control arms, trailing arms, ball joints, trans mounts, engine mounts, etc. Are these mostly handling/track based mods? Can we throw in trans mounts and call it good?

Tuning:
Another thing that isn't readily available to my knowledge is flash-only launch control. I'm not up to date on the JB4 feature set as I know NLS and 2-step exists but is there a configurable rpm-based launch control? Are other systems like WOTbox capable? Ontop of these extra functionalities, is custom tuning needed in first gear to get the most out of it? MHD and JB4 both allow boost by gear -- is that all that's needed? Is all of this even necessary or can 10 second ET be had without it?

WOTBox: $199
JB4: $499+ (don't more module cost more?)

As the 2 cars in the 9's have proven, a trans swap is the only solution to get below a ten as yet.
 
Jul 3, 2018
331
#2
I was actually going to start a similar thread, but suspension-oriented because that seems to be where the most lack of information is. As of now I plan on contacting @[email protected] for feedback on my plans for a suspension setup though.

I'm an auto and as such haven't looked at anything clutch related, but as far as trans stuff goes in general (which is the biggest limiting factor on these cars atm), the issue is building boost at the line. That's the reason the DCT does well on an airstrip but lacks in the 1/4, and also the largest reason for trans swaps to things like a 4l80, TH400 or powerglide. The BMW trans options (dct/ZF anyway) shift much faster than any of those and should outperform them all day long but we don't have a trans brake or other proper launch control option. As of right now your best option is the WOTBOX for that kind of stuff- from what I understand the JB4 uses a method that works for the "fun" aspect but not the serious boost building you need.

Diff: the diff braces are cheap and definitely wont hurt. Personally I'm gonna give with the bushing and arm style one rather than the typical metal bracket one, because they're adjustable, supposed to hold stiffer, and the brackets have been known to break after a while with heavy abuse like the 1/4 will do to them.

I haven't heard much from anyone welding their stock diff but its something I've considered doing tbh. Cheap and guaranteed lockup. The typical LSD options are more hearty than stock afaik, but not bulletproof and you should go with one that offers full lockup rather than a Torsen style for the best launches. Not 100% sure where you got the $10k number from for an 8.8 swap (is that a fully built and optioned out ADE setup?) but other people now offer an option for mounting an 8.8 for much much cheaper than ADE. Couple that with finding a good condition used 8.8 + axles and you could do it way cheaper. I believe the more recent 8.8 swaps people have only spent ~1.5-4k on parts depending on other factors like getting the diff built and going for lockers or not.

Axles: I think the Mfactory are the easiest option for a stock diff yes. But I've also heard of several people using their stock axles even with things like stg 3 MMPs. I'd assume that's with tuning away from crazy torque at 1.7K rpm and on healthy axles. The 8.8 swap would also address this section, as would an M3 diff swap although that's still not an ideal route for the 1/4 and cost would be close to a cheaper 8.8 swap. I think the DSS has also started doing more custom axles for people too now, not sure on cost there - likely depends on materials used etc.

Tires: without a doubt the best performance option here is 15" wheels with MT ETs. Tires are hugely important for good ETs. Really even without high end turbos, with the right tire and suspension we'd have enough power to run 10s. On the bright side, you really only need 2 of each if going this route and can keep whatever other wheels for dailying if you want, the front wheels wont make much of a difference if you aren't trying to eek out every .01 you can. 17s and any form of radial will be an improvement over stock wheels for sure while also saving the hassle of potentially swapping the rears if you want to daily still. Boils down to if you prefer ETs or street driving.

Suspension: like I said, this is where there's not a whole lot of info on the best setup for our platform. However it seems like the cars running best times are sticking to OE springs, and swapping the rear shocks for drag shocks. You can go the ADE route of getting an eyelet lower mount and using something like the Strange shocks, although it's been discovered that some older Mustang double adjustable shocks fit our cars perfectly with stock style mounts and cost like $180 for the pair or something crazy low like that. I'll likely be trying those out with the Turner lower rear solid monoball mounts just because of cost factor and the almost guaranteed improvement over OE. I'd stay away from any current typical aftermarket suspension packages and coil overs, since every one of them I've seen is geared towards making the rear and front equally stiff or at least oriented towards keeping the car flat around a track, when we want squat in the rear end.

As far as control arms, bushings etc - adjustable monoball toe links will probably be required for the best setup. To get an IRS setup for the 1/4 you want as many solid monoball bushings as you can have on control your control arms, and solid bushings elsewhere will definitely only help if you dont care about NVH. You could go the cheaper route and do some M3 components for the monoball and stiffer components plus aftermarket for things like the toe arms etc, or go all out with all aftermarket adjustable arms and completely dial in your suspension yourself instead of relying on an M3 or E9x alignment. As far as mounts go, I'd venture to say as a MT youd benefit from stiffer trans mounts - I don't know how much engine mounts will help if you dont just go with solid mounts tbh. Youd likely just be making a middle ground compromise if you just did poly mounts.
 
Apr 12, 2018
22
#3
but other people now offer an option for mounting an 8.8 for much much cheaper than ADE. Couple that with finding a good condition used 8.8 + axles and you could do it way cheaper. I believe the more recent 8.8 swaps people have only spent ~1.5-4k.[/QUOTE]

Do you have links to 8.8 swap on the cheaper side.

Same with the older mustang shocks

Thanks
 
Jul 3, 2018
331
#4
Do you have links to 8.8 swap on the cheaper side.

Same with the older mustang shocks

Thanks
Shocks: https://www.summitracing.com/parts/cee-2740
Fair warning: I don't know exactly what the travel is on these, let alone compared to OE rear shocks. So not sure if anything else in the rear needs changed like bump stops or something, but I do know people have them installed (including @[email protected] as well as others) and that at least one person was using stock springs for sure with them.

8.8 mount brackets: http://lse90.com/product/e9x-e82-ford-8-8-ird-diff-swap-brackets/
As it says, you'd need to source some of your own parts with this option like a way to adapt the driveshaft to the 8.8 diff, which the ADE kit does include but the price here is much much cheaper even if you have to source your own adapter or modified driveshaft. Doesnt include axles either, but I dont think the ADE one does anyway. Also not sure how big of an operation this is, but in the FB groups theres more confirmed people running this than people who've received the ADE kit in the last year or so.
 

Attachments

Dec 1, 2016
212
New York
#5
Why don't you focus on beating the current records that have NONE of that work done before you throw parts at the car?

The answer to a lot of the above obviously depends on how fast you want to go though lol

A few comments:
* 335is clutch might "hold" 600wtq in a roll race, but, it is not that grippy. It's fairly easy to slip a 335is clutch off the line.
* Most of those tires are not drag race oriented tires. A sticky roadcourse tire is not going to launch well just because it's a soft tire compound. Many of those tires, like Nt-01, have fairly stiff sidewalls. You note some of these cost/benefits yourself so obviously stick with the drag oriented tires.
* A true LSD isn't necessarily going to be a game changer when still learning. E-diff is fairly decent at keeping wheels speeds even when ripping the car in a straight line.
* Axels - I'd replace things as they break, honestly.
* coilovers - I've never setup a cars suspension for drag, but, coil-overs are something that I think are a step backwards for drag racing. Just about every coilover I have seen is short bodied to drop ride height. They also have much less travel than stock struts. For drag, you want to be maximizing weight transfer to get off the line and maintain grip on the drive wheels. Stock bushings and suspension components are actually way more ideal for drag than 99% of what people are doing to their cars suspension... You generally want dual adjustable struts though... this way you can setup the front struts to rebound quickly and the rear struts to compress quickly.
 
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Jun 27, 2017
48
#6
Tuning:
[...]As of right now your best option is the WOTBOX for that kind of stuff- from what I understand the JB4 uses a method that works for the "fun" aspect but not the serious boost building you need.
$200 and a few hours of DIY seem like a worthwhile and cheap upgrade that should be 1st on the list. That consistent launch will be crucial in determining which other components are making a difference.

Diff:
[...]The typical LSD options are more hearty than stock afaik, but not bulletproof and you should go with one that offers full lockup rather than a Torsen style for the best launches. [...]]
Without trawling the newbie forums' drag compilation thread, I can't say this upgrade really helps you get down the track any faster than an open diff. Based on my limited knowledge, people spin in 1st just as badly with or without. Sounds like diff lockdown is cheap and easy, welding is a compromise and LSD is overkill and not budget friendly.

Axles:
I think the Mfactory are the easiest option for a stock diff yes.[...]
Sounds like $1,000 upgrade here is going to be mandatory for safety. DSS or MFactory -- same price.

Tires:
without a doubt the best performance option here is 15" wheels with MT ETs. Tires are hugely important for good ETs. Really even without high end turbos, with the right tire and suspension we'd have enough power to run 10s. On the bright side, you really only need 2 of each if going this route and can keep whatever other wheels for dailying[...]
So what's the right tire? Will a 17" DR be "enough" for a 10.X ET or is the premium of a 15" worth the hassle and why?A 15" has the additional costs of caliper, rotor, bracket, new 15" wheels, the bias-ply themselves, and potentially labor if someone isn't mechanically inclined. Can easily see this adding up to the $1500+ total. What are the downsides to going to 15"? Additional set of wheels, possibly too much grip and start snapping/twisting driveline components. Will a 17" be safer or would a bias-ply actually help us avoid needing upgraded axles/diffs?

HK RS4, BFG Cup2, and Mich Cup4s: Overpriced and not directly suited to this application.
17/255 595 RS-RR : $200
17/275 nt555r : $360
15/255 or 275 MT ET: $400
17/275 nt01 : $440
17/275 R888R : $440 : These seem to be highly recommended everywhere and work well on the street if you don't care about longevity.
17/275 MT ETs: $450

Bias Ply:
M&H, Hoosier, MT: $475
They're all the same price and offer both 15" and 17" sizes. Might be cheaper for 15s, didn't look.

There's the whole discussion on tires here too: https://bmw.spoolstreet.com/threads/600-hp-tire-wheel-options.1552/

Given the small delta in price, bias ply seems like a no brainer over the drag radials assuming you aren't going to sketchily drive to/from track on barely-DOT tires above.

Suspension:
[...] However it seems like the cars running best times are sticking to OE springs, and swapping the rear shocks for drag shocks. You can go the ADE route of getting an eyelet lower mount and using something like the Strange shocks, although it's been discovered that some older Mustang double adjustable shocks fit our cars perfectly with stock style mounts and cost like $180 for the pair or something crazy low like that. I'll likely be trying those out with the Turner lower rear solid monoball mounts just because of cost factor and the almost guaranteed improvement over OE. I'd stay away from any current typical aftermarket suspension packages and coil overs, since every one of them I've seen is geared towards making the rear and front equally stiff or at least oriented towards keeping the car flat around a track, when we want squat in the rear end.
This was an awesome trove of info! Thank you so much.
I'll do my best to go find data on each of these
OE springs+drag shocks @ ~$500? Do you have any links or know where I can find them? Only option I see popping up are $500 konis.
Mustang Rear Shocks @ $180 Thanks for the link here!
Strange Eng Shocks from ADE @ $650

Traditional Coilovers @ $900-1500 can actually reduce launch capabilities and worsen ETs. Do you have any threads or data corroborating this claim?

Susp Misc:
As far as control arms, bushings etc - adjustable monoball toe links will probably be required for the best setup. To get an IRS setup for the 1/4 you want as many solid monoball bushings as you can have on control your control arms, and solid bushings elsewhere will definitely only help if you dont care about NVH. You could go the cheaper route and do some M3 components for the monoball and stiffer components plus aftermarket for things like the toe arms etc, or go all out with all aftermarket adjustable arms and completely dial in your suspension yourself instead of relying on an M3 or E9x alignment. As far as mounts go, I'd venture to say as a MT youd benefit from stiffer trans mounts - I don't know how much engine mounts will help if you dont just go with solid mounts tbh. Youd likely just be making a middle ground compromise if you just did poly mounts.
This sounds nice and correct yet -- when does this come into play? How effective are these going to be? Is this a finishing touch after 15" and everything else or an early step before LSD, etc? Any data on these monoball setups and solid bushings?

==============================================
==============================================
==============================================

Why don't you focus on beating the current records that have NONE of that work done before you throw parts at the car?

The answer to a lot of the above obviously depends on how fast you want to go though lol

A few comments:
* 335is clutch might "hold" 600wtq in a roll race, but, it is not that grippy. It's fairly easy to slip a 335is clutch off the line.
* Most of those tires are not drag race oriented tires. A sticky roadcourse tire is not going to launch well just because it's a soft tire compound. Many of those tires, like Nt-01, have fairly stiff sidewalls. You note some of these cost/benefits yourself so obviously stick with the drag oriented tires.
* A true LSD isn't necessarily going to be a game changer when still learning. E-diff is fairly decent at keeping wheels speeds even when ripping the car in a straight line.
* Axels - I'd replace things as they break, honestly.
* coilovers - I've never setup a cars suspension for drag, but, coil-overs are something that I think are a step backwards for drag racing. Just about every coilover I have seen is short bodied to drop ride height. They also have much less travel than stock struts. For drag, you want to be maximizing weight transfer to get off the line and maintain grip on the drive wheels. Stock bushings and suspension components are actually way more ideal for drag than 99% of what people are doing to their cars suspension... You generally want dual adjustable struts though... this way you can setup the front struts to rebound quickly and the rear struts to compress quickly.
I don't know what those records are or if they're listed anywhere. We have the 10 second list here on spoolstreet but that doesn't have a lot of the build info nor is it exhaustive. Dragtimes also has next to no build info :(

I'm trying to outline the ordering of components to incrementally improve ETs. Obviously no sense in doing a 8.8 swap if you're on stock runflats. What's the relative order of importance and which components are prerequisites and which complement each other but are mostly useless on their own?

Assuming the power is there...

Round 1: $1905
$25 Trans Mounts (034)
$100 Motor Mounts (034)
$100 Diff Brace
$180 Mustang rear shocks and OE springs?
$200 WOT Box
$450 17" Bias Ply
$500 17" wheels
$350 335is clutch
==
Round 2: $2650
$250 Welded Diff
$650 Strange Engineering Rear Shocks
$700 spec3+ is going to be more sturdy
$1000 axle set when one inevitably snaps

Suspension: leave OEM and experiment with shocks (mustang, koni drag, strange). I actually have fully adjustable KWs so maybe I can work something out there.
 

Hydra Performance

Corporal
Platinum Vendor
Jan 31, 2017
181
#7
Don't forget to also include 275/40/17 Hoosier DR2s and Toyo TQ Drag Radials. I would also include upgraded rear subframe bushings on the suspension list as well
 
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Jun 27, 2017
48
#8
Don't forget to also include 275/40/17 Hoosier DR2s and Toyo TQ Drag Radials. You also forgot to include subframe bushings on the suspension list as well
This sounds nice and correct yet -- when does this come into play? How effective are these going to be? Is this a finishing touch after 15" and everything else or an early step before LSD, etc? Any data on these monoball setups and solid bushings?

As in, any data to back up why I should include them? This thread seems to agree with you but no real data there.
https://bmw.spoolstreet.com/threads/every-mod-still-have-wheel-hop.3241/
 

EstorilMSport

New Member
Free Vendor
Jun 25, 2018
4
#9
What wheel is everyone running for 17" Drag radial setups and where are they purchasing them from? Assuming something lightweight and 17x9, I'm having a hard time finding something myself on first couple of looks (tire rack wont search for 17" wheels on my F30). Thanks.
 
Jun 27, 2017
48
#10
Apex arc8s are popular. I'm eyeing some kosei k1s and dforce ltw5s myself. Kosei are hard to find.
 
Jul 3, 2018
331
#11
*snip*

I'm trying to outline the ordering of components to incrementally improve ETs. Obviously no sense in doing a 8.8 swap if you're on stock runflats. What's the relative order of importance and which components are prerequisites and which complement each other but are mostly useless on their own?

Assuming the power is there...

Round 1: $1905
$25 Trans Mounts (034)
$100 Motor Mounts (034)
$100 Diff Brace
$180 Mustang rear shocks and OE springs?
$200 WOT Box
$450 17" Bias Ply
$500 17" wheels
$350 335is clutch
==
Round 2: $2650
$250 Welded Diff
$650 Strange Engineering Rear Shocks
$700 spec3+ is going to be more sturdy
$1000 axle set when one inevitably snaps

Suspension: leave OEM and experiment with shocks (mustang, koni drag, strange). I actually have fully adjustable KWs so maybe I can work something out there.
I wouldn't go with 034 mounts at all, actually. Their N54 engine mounts are known for catastrophic failure. Like others have said, all of this stuff really depends on how fast you want to go and what your other goals are. If you're gonna drive on the street most of the time still, a softer poly engine mount is your best bet (60a BFI, Turner or revshift seem to be the winners atm) paired with either Revshift poly mounts or Rogue Engineering mounts + cups are your best bet for increased performance + comfort. Otherwise if comfort isn't a concern, solid mounts reign supreme all around. I also agree that a LSD or other diff upgrade and axles are something to wait on until you encounter issues unless you're going all in all at once. I'd even venture to say that assuming you have twins or a quick spooling single, the WOTBOX could be held off on too.

Everything listed really compliments each other for the best times, but if you have the power already and were to do the other things one at a time I'd say the order would be:
1.Wheels + tires (smaller and lighter wheels = less unsprung weight which is a huge benefit. Sticky tires, specifically drag tires, will allow you to make use of your power instead of just spinning the power away)
2. Shocks + springs to help with squat which will make the weight of your car plant the rear tires down, increasing traction further and letting you put more power down.
3. Control arms - less deflection in the suspension means less tq going to waste and instead again going down through your tires.
4. Subframe/diff bushings - again helps eliminate deflection and put the power down instead of wasting it bending parts of your chasis.

The diff brace is cheap enough (imo) and easy enough to install that I'd consider it a "whenever" part, but if you're pinching pennies I'd get tires and shocks first, and evaluate your wheel hop on launches to see if you need it yet. The WOTBox while certainly nice for building boost at the line will be useless if the boost you build is just used to spin the tires instead of move you down the track.

The reason I said most common e9x coilover kits would probably be detrimental is due to wanting the car to squat and then rebalance which requires adjustable compression and rebound. Most off the shelf setups are targeted towards lessening compression in the rear, and allow you to increase rebound rates rather than make it less than your compression, as this helps keep the car stable around a track when going from deceleration to acceleration and vice versa. Maybe not every kit is detrimental, but you really need that squat to get off the line so unless its a double adjustable rear setup then chances are the OE setup would be better for the 1/4 due to being softer and squatting more.
 
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Jul 3, 2018
331
#13
Parts do nothing without a driver mod.
Absolutely correct. But the best "driver mod" wont beat anyone down the strip if they're stuck in a '93 Festiva on a donut and a bad clutch either, so not very pertinent to the thread.
 

SJ_1989

New Member
Aug 7, 2018
9
Peoria, IL
#14
First post, woot!

I've started this investigation and have done, am doing, will be doing most or all of these things to make a dedicated "drag car". Here's my feedback. I'm sure I'm missing things and there are things I don't know yet either.

Why don't you focus on beating the current records that have NONE of that work done before you throw parts at the car?

The answer to a lot of the above obviously depends on how fast you want to go though lol
This x100. You need to have a goal in mind. Cost goes up exponentially with lower ET's. Did I follow my own advice....no. Don't say I didn't warn you.

I don't see anyone talking about the most important thing, driver safety. For anyone serious about drag racing, I'd order an NHRA and IHRA rule book. Can be had for $10 each. There are a number of things you'll need depending on how fast you want to go and if you run slicks or not. Here's a few that I can remember off the top of my head but definitely not all (I'm reviewing the rulebook now and trying to get setup for 2019 race season). I can create another thread dedicated to the rules if one doesn't exist and if there is a desire for the community.

Apparel
Helmet definitely. Depending on how fast you want to go.....jacket, pants, gloves.

Roll bar/cage
Want to run faster than 11.49?....need a roll bar (5 point minimum I believe). If you have an unaltered firewall, it's good till 10.0 AND less than 135 mph. Lower than 10 (down to 8.5) OR faster than 135 mph, you need a roll cage (10 point I think.....cage is NOT the same as a roll bar). Want 9's?.....you'll need the cage certified and an NHRA license. Be prepared to spend a decent amount of money if you want that 9.

Slicks
If running slicks you'll need a drive shaft loop. I believe drag radials don't require them. If using a tubeless slick, you'll need a metal valve stem. I can't remember at which point wheel studs are required, but that's an upgrade that should be done regardless. There's other factors just can't remember off the top of my head.

If the track is NHRA or IHRA sanctioned, then they are suppose to follow the rulebooks and may even be stricter. Whether they actually do that or not is another story. If the track is not sanctioned by NHRA or IHRA, then you'll need to review their rules. Moral of the story......figure out what your goal is and where you plan on racing before dumping money into your car. It can get expensive quickly. It's no fun to have all that power and can't use it.

Bias Ply:
M&H, Hoosier, MT: $475
They're all the same price and offer both 15" and 17" sizes. Might be cheaper for 15s, didn't look.

There's the whole discussion on tires here too: https://bmw.spoolstreet.com/threads/600-hp-tire-wheel-options.1552/

Given the small delta in price, bias ply seems like a no brainer over the drag radials assuming you aren't going to sketchily drive to/from track on barely-DOT tires above.
I'm on stock axles (probably not for long) and I went with bias ply's just to help with driveline shock since I'm a 6MT. 28x10x17 Hoosier rear and 27.5x5x17 Hoosier front skinny. We'll see how long the axles last lol.

I would not drive bias ply's on the street. And definitely don't mix radial front's with bias ply rears. Many do but I've heard some pretty sketchy stories and it's not worth totaling my car for.

What wheel is everyone running for 17" Drag radial setups and where are they purchasing them from? Assuming something lightweight and 17x9, I'm having a hard time finding something myself on first couple of looks (tire rack wont search for 17" wheels on my F30). Thanks.
I have 17x8.5 ET40 O.Z. Alleggerita and they just clear the caliper on my E90 for the rears. Got them from tirerack.
 
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