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Buy this, Not that!

Discussion in 'BMW General' started by NoQuarter, Aug 9, 2018.

  1. fmorelli

    fmorelli Captain

    Messages:
    1,220
    Ride:
    E89 Z4 35i, F10 535d
    I have about a half dozen torque wrenches. With modern cars, there is a bunch of stuff where having a low number torque wrench is invaluable, especially when one doesn't wish to crack plastic parts. Wera makes a nice 1/4" torque wrench, which I've been using for the past year or so. Wera has it made in Taiwan, but it comes with a calibration certificate from Germany, where QC is performed. They are +/-4% which is accurate enough for what we use them for.

    Right now there is a screaming deal on a return at Warehouse Deals at $102 shipped, instead of the usual near $150. If you are looking for a 1/4" torque wrench that can cover 1-25NM, I highly recommend this torque wrench. First one that pulls the trigger gets it for just $100 ...

    One thing to consider, at low torque values, I prefer handling the wrench with several fingers instead of the grip of my palm, since it is a far more delicate tightening operation. The wrench uses a twist handle to set the target value, with a positive release and set detent when adjusting the handle. Grip is a plastic/rubber combo which provides good grip and cleans up easily with carb or brake cleaner, and does not damage the plastics.

    Filippo

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  2. NoGuru

    NoGuru Corporal

    Messages:
    144
    Location:
    Just North of Detroit
    Ride:
    BMW 335is
  3. Cheezy

    Cheezy Lieutenant

    Messages:
    545
    Location:
    Toledo Ohio
    Ok this may be a common thing people already have, but I believe that ever single person that works on any vehicle should buy one of these. Its not often that I even use it for 1/4in nuts and bolts, mostly I'm putting 1/4 screwdriver, torx, allen bits into them to reach tight spaces where I can't get a ratchet and socket. It's the same idea as a bit holder, except even thinner still. I have found myself in places where I even needed to grind the bits down to fit. Screenshot_20180810-145155.png
     
  4. fmorelli

    fmorelli Captain

    Messages:
    1,220
    Ride:
    E89 Z4 35i, F10 535d
    Smart. @[email protected] what was I doing just today? Working on 8mm bolts holding down the ignition housing on an M20 - I sure could have used this instead of the adjustable wrench clasping a square drive adapter attached to a socket ...

    Filippo
     
  5. NoQuarter

    NoQuarter Lieutenant

    Messages:
    748
    Location:
    Indiana
    Ride:
    Z4 35is, 535xi, X5 35i
    I like this similar Kolbalt brand wrench with bits. 20180810_160933.jpg
     
  6. fmorelli

    fmorelli Captain

    Messages:
    1,220
    Ride:
    E89 Z4 35i, F10 535d
    The benchmark multimeter company is without a doubt, Fluke. These units go for several hundred dollars and up, and one knows exactly what one is buying.

    About a ten years ago or so, I read a long and detailed comparison of a Harbor Freight sold multimeter which was tested against a Fluke. The results were very acceptable, and the cost was incredibly inexpensive. To boot, it included a host of other convenient functions - luminosity, decibel reader, and K type thermocouple temperature reading. In my various workings, I've found these added capabilities useful. I have two of them - one which gets frequent use in the guitar shop, and the other of course in the garage. The meter is backlit, runs on 3 AAA batteries and seems to last a long time on those batteries.

    Wait, what's the meter called? The unit is a Mastech MS8229 which used to be sold at Harbor Freight as a Cen-Tech P98674. This unit can be had on Amazon Prime for a whopping $50. If you want to wait a couple weeks, Aliexpress can get it to you for $40.

    For the serious hobbyist one will find reviews that show its measurements to be reasonably accurate. For someone doing serious electronics design work, they're going to go with top shelf multimeters and pay for the increase in accuracy necessary for their functions.

    Filippo

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  7. fmorelli

    fmorelli Captain

    Messages:
    1,220
    Ride:
    E89 Z4 35i, F10 535d
    I really wish more people would post recommendations on this thread. I'm like the 1-man Italian Used Car Sales guy here ... help a brother out!

    Okay so tonight I'm posting about endoscopes/borescopes. These things have gotten stupid cheap. Plenty of apps in the app stores for them, aside from whatever is provided free with the kit you buy. This falls under the, one time you need it, paid for itself. $30 bucks for the setup, does WiFi or you can plug in direct. 5 meters is more than you'll ever need on the cable, and the cable is stiff so you can shape it. Want to look down your intake? Your piston tops? Comes with LED lights at the head. Last time I used it was to figure out clearance of my custom strut bar when closing my hood. The 1080P units have a pretty crisp picture. Just nuts that one can buy this stuff for $30 these days. Did I mention it has an IP68 waterproof attachment? Not to mention, want to save some money and do your own colonoscopy? Bam! No problem.

    Someone else needs to post - seriously this is getting embarrassing ...

    Filippo
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  8. The Convert

    The Convert Lieutenant

    Messages:
    729
    Ride:
    335
    The fact that I can get a sneak peak at yesterday's lunch ahead of time has me very interested in that horoscope. Lol
     
  9. langsbr

    langsbr Lieutenant

    Messages:
    520
    Ride:
    07 335i 6MT e90
  10. doublespaces

    doublespaces Administrator

    Messages:
    6,253
    Location:
    AZ
    Ride:
    2009 E93 335i
    Good thread. I just learned about these, can someone recommend for our automotive use? @nitemare says they've been around the aviation industry for a long time, I just haven't seen anyone use them:
    https://www.amazon.com/Sopoby-Connectors-Electrical-Waterproof-Automotive/dp/B01DPS8DPM/
    upload_2018-8-14_23-50-27.png

    EDIT: It happens by chance that the thread that brings me here is talking about the same product I am posting about, but did not actually realize it. I saw this product as Facebook ad earlier today and figured I'd post it here.
     
  11. VACust

    VACust Corporal

    Messages:
    101
    Location:
    US - Utah
    Springtools are a roll pin punch with a built in anvil in a spring on the head of the punch. I use them way more often than I thought I would. They come in multiple lengths and usually a 4 piece set. There is also a center punch and nail set punch. They are much easier to use than traditional punches with a hammer. They also apply a lot more force in a more controlled manner. Anyone whose tried to drift out a tight pin knows how hard it can be, you need three hands to do it sometimes. This is one of those tools you wish you would have bought years ago.
    https://www.amazon.com/Spring-Tools...ring+tools&dpPl=1&dpID=51R7sI-gH0L&ref=plSrch
     
  12. langsbr

    langsbr Lieutenant

    Messages:
    520
    Ride:
    07 335i 6MT e90
    Those look pretty cool, but after reading I think it was @Torgus' post about solder vs crimping for auto use, I'd be interested to get his take on it. I'd always been under the mistaken impression that solder was "better" but I see the arguments for crimping, and when thinking about it, pretty much every electrical connection in automotive use is either crimped or a plug connection, I can't recall a solder joint, even in service scenarios. Does anyone have a recommended open barrel crimper and open barrel crimps, for wire to wire connections, similar to how this connects wires?
     
  13. fmorelli

    fmorelli Captain

    Messages:
    1,220
    Ride:
    E89 Z4 35i, F10 535d
    Couple guys on another thread were talking about "TE" ones - @NoQuarter and @The Convert I think. I bugged them to post up about it here ...

    Filippo
     
  14. The Convert

    The Convert Lieutenant

    Messages:
    729
    Ride:
    335
    The ones made by TE are really good for splicing wires in areas where they'll see moisture. I use them exclusively.
     
  15. Torgus

    Torgus Sergeant

    Messages:
    419
    Location:
    Boston
    Those plugs are all full of crimped contacts/connectors btw. Crimps are fast and repeatable and you can also do a pull test on them(no not with your hands). I worked in a wire manufacturing house years ago. I know more than I ever want to about crimps and contacts etc.

    I'm sure the above solder shrink things work fine for the most part. They are not ideal, but they will work. There is a reason everything is crimes vs. Soldered in aviation, nautical, automotive, etc: Vibration.

    Solder is a means of making a good electrical connection, it is not a good type of mechanical connection. Surface mount on boards etc? Sure. Connecting two conductors? No. It was never designed for this purpose.

    You dont see lines men working on poles soldering. Btw that is why they are called linesmen pliers: https://www.vampiretools.com/blog/lineman-pliers-got-name/

    fl2000-9ne.png

    Every connection that has any chance of suffering from vibration is crimped.

    So will those connectors with solder in the middle work? Probably will. But it's not the right way to do it is my point.

    A properly crimped conductor will conduct better than a solder joint. You also have the issue if it is a power line vs. signal and you start drawing enough amperage through it it is going to warm up.

    Do what you will ;)
     
    Last edited: Aug 15, 2018 at 8:12 AM
  16. Torgus

    Torgus Sergeant

    Messages:
    419
    Location:
    Boston
    To go on, Why would anyone want to drag out a soldering iron to work on in a car in cramped spaces? Dripping blobs of solder, heating up the conductors correcting to get a good solder joint and not a cold solder joint, having a 500 degree iron that you can't sit down anywhere without damaging some plastic of insulation, having to drag out your iron and get an extension cord just to use it, dealing with flux and tinning the wires, cleaning the tip of the iron? F that noise.

    This will work fine for most people, simple, repeatable, fast:

    19015158_primary_450px.jpg

    Also comes with a built in stripper.


    You can get one with multiple jaws depending on the contacts you are using:

    s-l300.jpg



    Look at how nice this is, just cover with some shrink wrap if you are concerned. A heat gun works at much lower temps than an iron:

    single-crimp.jpg


    these are nice quick strippers with a built in crimper:

    15107.jpg



    Honestly, I would rather we discuss the more fun type of strippers.
     
  17. fmorelli

    fmorelli Captain

    Messages:
    1,220
    Ride:
    E89 Z4 35i, F10 535d
    Surely you jest.

    Okay I have a lot of wire strippers. Here are my favorite three:

    Stripmaster Wire stripper ... automagic wire strippers are fun, kind of like the Rube Goldberg Machine for wire strippers. Their fun, I guess. Whatever.
    411Noy+j-cL.jpg

    Stahlwille wire strippers - these are the finger type, use them in the garage all the time. Just stick the wire in and press, strips any size wire you throw at it.
    wire-stripping-pliers.jpg
    StewMac 2 in 1 Wire stripper cutters - Out of left field, I love these stripper. Just really convenient. Flip'em and you have cutters. Not too large, convenient handling. Probably my favorite of a half-dozen wire strippers ...
    2-in-1_Wire_Cutter_Stripper.jpg

    Filippo
     
  18. VACust

    VACust Corporal

    Messages:
    101
    Location:
    US - Utah
  19. Torgus

    Torgus Sergeant

    Messages:
    419
    Location:
    Boston
    I always thought automatic wire strippers would not work well. Then I bought a set. They are awesome.



    Is there an equivalent at non snap on prices? Hard to justify for a hobby mechanic.
     
  20. fmorelli

    fmorelli Captain

    Messages:
    1,220
    Ride:
    E89 Z4 35i, F10 535d
    Cool tool. Never knew about that. Seems useful if one was in a situation where one had room to wield something that size.

    That said, here are more reasonable prices - from Bahco and Knipex - two top European brands. This is the kind of thing you search for on Warehouse Deals and wait to snag it at a deal. I just did that with a 5 piece long screwdriver set from Wiha ... $24 but snagged for $17 on Warehouse Deals. Used those screwdrivers today ... fabulous.

    Filippo
     
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